manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Alyson Shotz and curator and historian Alessandra Comini. 

Alyson Shotz is the subject of three exhibitions this season. The Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College in Clinton, NY is presenting "Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature." The exhibition features several new and site-specific works, including a major wall drawing and a new sculpture called Lemniscate. The Wellin project was curated by Tracy L. Adler, and will be on view through April 5, 2015 before traveling to the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston.

Meanwhile, in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, Shotz is showing more new work in two more shows, one at Derek Eller Gallery and the other at the Carolina Nitsch Project Room. The show at Derek Eller is called "Time Lapse." It opens on October 10 and it’ll be on view through November 8. "Topographic Iterations" will be at Carolina Nitsch through November 15. 

This is Shotz’s Mirror Fence (2003), which she and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s program. It’s at Storm King Art Center. See more of the work here.

The 2014 MAN Podcast listener survey: Each fall we conduct a listener survey in an effort to learn a little bit more about our audience. Please help keep the MAN Podcast free to download by filling out this year’s survey. We need about 50 more responses. It shouldn’t take much more than three or four minutes, and it helps us out a lot. Thanks. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Reblogged from manpodcast

gagosiangallery:

A Conversation Between
John Elderfield, Chief Curator Emeritus of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Elizabeth Smith, Executive Director of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation

"Helen Frankenthaler: Composing with Color, Paintings 1962–1963"
September 11–October 18, 2014
Gagosian Gallery
980 Madison Avenue, New York

© Gagosian Gallery.  Filmed and edited by Pierce Jackson. Additional support, Anders Urmacher.
Artwork © 2014 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Photo: Helen Frankenthaler at work in her studio, New York, 1961 © Cora Kelley Ward

Reblogged from gagosiangallery

therumpus:

In Episode 17 of Make/Work, host Scott Pinkmountain speaks with writer Brett Fletcher Lauer. Fletcher Lauer’s poetry has appeared in American Poetry ReviewBoston ReviewFenceHarper’sTin House, and many other places. His debut book of poems, A Hotel in Belgium, was published this year by Four Way Books, and he’s also working on memoir and long form writing.

Fletcher Lauer speaks about his role as deputy director at the Poetry Society of America, where he’s worked for over ten years. He also talks about his reluctance to rely on personal connections to get his work into the world, even though it might have accelerated his career to do so.

I remember at an AWP maybe five years ago, someone said something like, “I hope your book comes out so people don’t think of you as the person who works at the Poetry Society of America.”… I was like “No, I’m a poet who works at the Poetry Society of America. I’m not an administrator who also dabbles in verse.”

Reblogged from therumpus

Your average music listener is actually quite good at figuring out other people based solely on their music taste. Most people can accurately predict a stranger’s levels of extroversion, creativity and open-mindedness by listening to just 10 of that person’s favorite songs. So if you really want to understand, say, President Obama’s politics, it might be worth going back to that presidential playlist he released and trying to figure out how exactly Jennifer Lopez’s “Get Right” corresponds to the undeniable wrongness of American politics.

What your taste in music really says about your personality  (via micdotcom)
Reblogged from micdotcom

laughingsquid:

John Oliver Reads Fan Mail in the Form of YouTube Comments on ‘Last Week Tonight’

Reblogged from laughingsquid

jasonwilliammcbride:

“My life was very, very dark and has gotten relatively lighter as years have gone on…I changed myself by using literature.” KA on Bookworm, 1992.

Reblogged from jacobwren

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Sheila Hicks.  

This week the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston opened "Fiber: Sculpture 1960-present." The exhibition, curated by Jenelle Porter, examines abstraction in fiber-based art from the mid-twentieth century to the present. The show includes 50 works by 34 artists. It’ll be on view in Boston through January 4, 2015. 

In the excellent catalogue, which was published by Prestel, Porter says, “Few artists have played as significant a role in the development of postwar fiber art as Sheila Hicks, and yet, to define her solely in relation to this medium would greatly undervalue her contribution to twentieth-century sculpture.” Hicks’ many exhibition credits include major exhibitions at the Stedelijk and at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, and, most recently, a 2011 retrospective organized by the Addison Gallery of American Art and curated by Joan Simon and Susan Faxon. (Porter coordinated the ICA Philadelphia installation of that show.) 

Hicks isn’t just a star of “Fiber.” Hicks recently completed conservation work on one of her most significant pieces, a 1966-67 commission for the Ford Foundation headquarters in New York. 

This is Hicks’ Banisteriopsis II (1965-66/2010) from the collection of the ICA Boston. 

The 2014 MAN Podcast listener survey: Each fall we conduct a listener survey in an effort to learn a little bit more about our audience. Please help keep the MAN Podcast free to download by filling out this year’s survey. We need about 75 more responses. It shouldn’t take much more than three or four minutes, and it helps us out a lot. Thanks. 

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Reblogged from manpodcast

manpodcast:

This weeks’ Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights three collection-driven exhibitions that mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I. The three exhibitions — at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Toledo Museum of Art and at the Dallas Museum of Art — take strikingly different approaches to showing how the Great War impacted artists. 

On the second segment, the Toledo Museum of Art’s Paula Reich discusses her exhibition "The Great War: Art on the Front Line," which is up through October 19. The show features paintings, sculpture and works on paper about the war and the home front. Among the highlights of the exhibition are Max Beckmann’s great 1923 painting The Trapeze, Picasso’s 1918 gouache Person Seated at a Table Plucking a Dead Bird, and Otto Dix’s great 1924 print of shell craters. 

This is a detail of Leger’s Sketch for “The City,” (1919), which is in the Toledo collection and which is discussed on this week’s program. In it, Leger begins a monumental series of paintings that documents the post-war industrialized urban environment.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Reblogged from manpodcast

hazlittmag:

The Arcade, Episode 33: Understanding Murakami

Student riots, atomic groups, and the art of translation. We explore the legacy of blockbuster novelist Haruki Murakami with the help of classical pianist Eunbi Kim, journalist Roland Kelts, and York University professor of Japanese literature (and Murakami translator!) Ted Goossen.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunesStitcherSoundcloud, and via RSS.

Reblogged from hazlittmag
manpodcast:

This weeks’ Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights three collection-driven exhibitions that mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I. The three exhibitions — at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Toledo Museum of Art and at the Dallas Museum of Art — take strikingly different approaches to showing how the Great War impacted artists. 
First, VMFA curator Mitchell Merling discusses his exhibition "The Great War: Printmakers of World War I," which is on view through November 11. While we mostly think of German artists as synthesizing their World War I experiences through print-making, Merling’s show looks instead at how British and American artists portrayed the war through prints. 
This is Kerr Eby’s Dawn, the 75’s Follow Up, one of the artworks Merling discusses on this week’s program.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

manpodcast:

This weeks’ Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights three collection-driven exhibitions that mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I. The three exhibitions — at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Toledo Museum of Art and at the Dallas Museum of Art — take strikingly different approaches to showing how the Great War impacted artists. 

First, VMFA curator Mitchell Merling discusses his exhibition "The Great War: Printmakers of World War I," which is on view through November 11. While we mostly think of German artists as synthesizing their World War I experiences through print-making, Merling’s show looks instead at how British and American artists portrayed the war through prints. 

This is Kerr Eby’s Dawn, the 75’s Follow Up, one of the artworks Merling discusses on this week’s program.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Reblogged from manpodcast